The Week in Early American History

TWEAHA relatively quiet week here; with the semester now underway everywhere, it’s probably not such a bad thing that we have fewer links to share. In any case, a little Revolution, an unidentified diary, and a forgotten war … on to the links!

Benjamin Franklin … Kickstarter? Forbes magazine reads the Founder as a crowd-sourcing early adopter.

Mark Cheathem looks at some recent scholarship on African-Americans during the War of 1812.

At the Past is Present blog, American Antiquarian Society staff have been discussing diaries whose authors were previously unidentified. This week, Lucia Ferguson talks about the Civil War experience of one Henry Martin. (Check out the first two posts on Martin’s diary here and here.)

In trying to manage the changes in the media environment today, Alexis Madrigal at The Atlantic reaches back and looks at how Daniel Defoe handled the proliferation of newspapers and what that might offer us today.

A fascinating student documentary about the battle over whether to preserve the Princeton Battlefield site in New Jersey. (h/t J.L. Bell, aka Boston1775)

Can’t get enough of the Revolution? (Who can!) There’s a new journal/website out there for you, the Journal of the American Revolution.

Also first noticed on Twitter, a neat blog that highlights colonial Mexico’s art and architecture from artist Richard Perry.

Last, a few more fellowship deadlines coming up, almost all for short-term research visits, and all due March 1:

Obviously this list is limited to what we can see. If you know of others with deadlines coming up, please feel free to share in the comments section.

One comment on “The Week in Early American History

  1. Matt Karp says:

    Inside Higher Ed has an interesting Q&A with AHA deputy director Rob Townsend on his new book about the professionalization of the historical discipline — ties in well with some of the blog’s earlier conversations about gaps between academic history and the rest of the historical universe.

    http://www.insidehighered.com/news/2013/02/04/new-book-professional-shift-discipline-history#.UQ-npxnyVVk.email

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