The Week in Early American History

TWEAHIt’s been a busy week of headlines for early Americanists: to the links!

At Long Island’s Rock Hall, archaeologists uncovered the interconnected lives of planters and slaves, while the 15-member Caribbean Community pressured Britain, France, and the Netherlands to pay reparations for slavery. On a related note, Jeannine Marie DeLombard pondered why Solomon Northup’s narrative got the Hollywood greenlight rather than Frederick Douglass’ autobiography; Lord Dunmore’s Proclamation got a second look;  Vincent Brown unveiled an interactive map of slave revolts; and John Garrison Marks reflected on using literary labels like “enslavement narratives” and “freedom narratives” to discern the nuances of antebellum ideologies.

Over at The Appendix, Benjamin Breen tracked the elusive Psalmanazar and Roy Scranton investigated Melville’s C.I.A. connection. The AP kept up regular dispatches from the frontlines of Tennessee, 1863,  and the New Republic’s Michael Schaffer reimagined Civil War reporting. Slate’s Rebecca Onion hunted the “snark” of John Adams’s thoughts on George Washington. The Economist reviewed the Hogarthian pleasures of life and politics in Georgian London; and bloggers webwide found ghostly traces of early America in celebrating Halloween.

In La Angostura, Mexico, local community members spoke about the quest to honor the San Patricios, or St. Patrick’s Brigade, and their struggle to educate visitors about a seemingly forgotten conflict. Elsewhere, conference-goers debated military history’s centrality to understanding Civil War topics. Historians and art lovers, take note: the treasures of the Kinsey Collection, a multigenerational collection of African-American manuscripts and artifacts spanning four centuries, continued on tour; and  RISD opened a new show, “Making It in America” with plenty of familiar (Copley) faces. And in Forbes, Nathan Raab discusses the journeys that historical documents make. Finally, there’s still time to brush up on your election day history before Nov. 5!

One comment on “The Week in Early American History

  1. James B Stewart says:

    sarahj: Your report on the conference is so smart and so valuable! I’m sorry I’m so slow in giving it and you the praise and thanks you deserve.

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