Junto March Madness Sweet Sixteen Results

JMM16You guys, when I remarked how unusual it was for there to be a tie in March Madness, that was NOT an invitation to tie a bunch of other brackets. And yet, here we are.

Some brackets behaved. Top seeds Morgan and Zagarri won in Atlantic World and Gender, respectively. Our American Revolution, Historiography and Theory, and Slavery and Race formation brackets also followed suit, with Young, Lepore, and Morgan winning their brackets. Things went topsy-turvy in Economic and Social History, the History of Ideas, and Native American history. I hereby declare today ye Day of Many Runoff Polls.

Atlantic World

(1) Morgan, Jennifer. “‘Some Could Suckle over their Shoulder’: Male Travelers, Female Bodies, and the Gendering of Racial Ideology, 1500–1700.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 54, no. 1 (January 1997), 167–192. 53% beat
(2) Games, Alison. “Atlantic History: Definitions, Challenges, and Opportunities.” American Historical Review 111, no. 3 (June 2006): 741–57. 47%

Gender

(1) Zagarri, Rosemarie. “The Rights of Man and Woman in Post-Revolutionary America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 55, no. 2 (April 1998): 203–230. 58% beat
(2) Kerber, Linda. “Separate Spheres, Female Worlds, Woman’s Place: The Rhetoric of Women’s History.” Journal of American History 75 (1988): 9–3942%

Economic and Social History

(1) Breen, T. H.  “Baubles of Britain: The American and Consumer Revolutions of the Eighteenth Century.” Past & Present 119 (1988): 73–104. 50% tied
(2) Maier, Pauline. “Popular Uprisings and Civil Authority in Eighteenth-Century America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, 27, No. 1 (Jan., 1970): 3–35. 50%

American Revolution

(1) Young, Alfred. “George Robert Twelves Hewes (1742–1840): A Boston Shoemaker and the Memory of the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 38, no. 4 (Oct. 1981): 561–623. 59% beat 
(3) Lemisch, Jesse. “Jack Tarr in the Streets: Merchant Seamen in the Politics of Revolutionary America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 25, no. 3 (July 1968): 371–407. 41%

History of Ideas

(8) Butler, Jon. “Enthusiasm Described and Decried: The Great Awakening as Interpretative Fiction.” Journal of American History 69, no. 2 (Sept. 1982): 305–325. 50% tied
(6) Grasso, Christopher. “Deist Monster: On Religious Common Sense in the Wake of the American Revolution.” Journal of American History 95, no. 2 (June 1995): 43–68. 50%

Historiography/Theory

(4) Saunt, Claudio. “Go West: Mapping Early American Historiography.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 65, no. 4 (October 2008): 745–78. 47% lost to
(2) Lepore, Jill. “Historians Who Love Too Much: Reflections on Microhistory and Biography.” Journal of American History 88, no.1 (June 2001): 129–144. 53%

Native American History

(1) Hämäläinen, Pekka. “The Politics of Grass: European Expansion, Ecological Change, and Indigenous Power in the Southwest Borderlands.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 67, no. 2 (April 2010): 173–208. 50% tied
(3) Richter, Daniel. “War and Culture: The Iroquois Experience.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 40, no. 4 (October 1983): 528–59. 50%

Slavery and Race Formation

(1) Morgan, Edmund. “Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox.” Journal of American History 59, no. 1 (June 1972): 5–29. 52% beat
(6) O’Malley, Gregory E. “Beyond the Middle Passage: Slave Migration from the Caribbean to North America, 1619-1807.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 66, no. 1 (January 2009): 125–72. 48%

Runoff voting starts today and ends today at 5 p.m. I’ll announce the Elite Eight tomorrow, and voting will begin.

Economic and Social History

History of Ideas

Native American History

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