Junto March Madness 2017: Sweet Sixteen

JMM17 LogoThe Round of 32 voting is completed and we have out Sweet Sixteen match-ups. See the bracket below for results. Below that, begin voting for the next round. Voting for the Round of 16 will conclude Thursday, March 23rd at 5pm EST. Results and the Round of 8 match-ups will be posted on the morning of Friday, March 24th. Happy voting!

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Round of 16 

Junto March Madness 2017 is Here!

Welcome one and all to the 5th annual Junto March Madness (#JMM17). This year’s tournament will cover books in early American history (broadly defined) published since 2014. There are, however, a few key differences from past years. First, this year’s tournament will feature 32 books rather than 64. Moreover, we have decided to forego the open nomination process. The 32 works in the bracket below were selected by the 25 members of the blog. Before voting begins, let me also offer our usual disclaimer: JMM is meant to be fun and to expose more people to excellent recent scholarship on early America. It is not meant to determine the “best” book on early American history since 2014 but to show the favorites of our readers. As always, we encourage participants to use both the comments here on the blog and our hashtag (#JMM17) to discuss these works. With that out of the way, here is this year’s bracket (click for full-size): Continue reading

Guest Cross-Post: Benjamin Carp, “The Paradox of Paradox”

As all of you are aware, Edmund S. Morgan’s June 1972 Journal of American History article“Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox” was the victor of “March Madness” tournament for best journal article in American history. This victory shouldn’t have been a surprise, as such a thing is old hat for Morgan. His larger book, American Slavery, American Freedom: The Ordeal of Colonial Virginia (1975), already won for best book in 2013. The timing was perfect: just a month ago, Benjamin Carp, the Daniel M. Lyons Professor of American History at Brooklyn College, published a fantastic review essay “In Retrospect: Edmund S. Morgan and the Urgency of Good Leadership,” in Reviews in American History (see his #edmorgan100 tweets storified by our own Michael D. Hattem’s here). The OAH’s blog Process History invited Dr. Carp to write his reflections on the article (see here), and they kindly invited us to cross-post it. 

Carp“Slavery and Freedom” is an article about Puritans, even though it doesn’t mention them at all; it’s about what happens when you try to colonize a place without them. Continue reading