The JuntoCast, Episode 7: The Great Awakening

The JuntoCastIn this month’s episode of “The JuntoCast,” Ken Owen, Michael Hattem, Roy Rogers, and Mark Boonshoft discuss the Great Awakening, including its historiography, its relationship to the American Revolution, and its contemporary significance.

You can click here to listen to the mp3 in a new window or right-click to download and save for later. You can also subscribe to the podcast in iTunes. We would greatly appreciate it if our listeners could take a moment to rate or, better yet, review the podcast in iTunes. As always, any and all feedback from our listeners is greatly welcomed and appreciated.

Further Reading

Andrews, Dee. The Methodists and Revolutionary America, 1760-1800: The Shaping of an Evangelical Culture. Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2000.

Butler, Jon. Awash in a Sea of Faith: Christianizing the American People. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1990.

———. “Enthusiasm Described and Decried: The Great Awakening as Interpretative Fiction.” Journal of American History 69, no. 2 (1982): 305-325.

Fisher, Linford D. The Indian Great Awakening: Religion and the Shaping of Native Cultures in Early America. New York: Oxford University Press, 2012.

Goff, Philip. “Revivals and Revolution: Historiographic Turns since Alan Heimert’s ‘Religion and the American Mind.’” Church History 67, no. 4 (1998): 695–721.

Heimert, Alan. Religion and the American Mind, from the Great Awakening to the Revolution. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1966.

Kidd, Thomas S. The Great Awakening: The Roots of Evangelical Christianity in Colonial America. New Haven: Yale University Press, 2007.

Lambert, Frank. Inventing the “Great Awakening.” Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1999.

Murrin, John. “No Awakening, No Revolution? More Counterfactual Speculations.” Reviews in American History 11 (1983): 161–171.

Stout, Harry S. The New England Soul: Preaching and Religious Culture in Colonial New England. New York: Oxford University Press, 1986.

Seeman, Erik R. Pious Persuasions: Laity and Clergy in Eighteenth-Century New England. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999.

One comment on “The JuntoCast, Episode 7: The Great Awakening

  1. […] Our first new member is Mark Boonshoft. He is currently a Ph.D. candidate in early American history at Ohio State University, where he also co-organizes the Ohio Seminar in Early American History and Culture. Mark’s dissertation traces the development of educational and cultural institutions in the mid-Atlantic and upper South from the First Great Awakening to the early nineteenth century. He has published an article in New York History and has a forthcoming article in the Journal of the Early Republic. Mark has written two guest posts for The Junto, including the memorable “WFAN” post on the role of sports in popular historical thinking and, most recently, one on strategies for teaching undergraduates political parties and alignments in the early republic. Mark has also been a guest panelist on The JuntoCast, contributing to an episode on the Great Awakening. […]

Engage

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s