Junto March Madness 2017: Sweet Sixteen

JMM17 LogoThe Round of 32 voting is completed and we have out Sweet Sixteen match-ups. See the bracket below for results. Below that, begin voting for the next round. Voting for the Round of 16 will conclude Thursday, March 23rd at 5pm EST. Results and the Round of 8 match-ups will be posted on the morning of Friday, March 24th. Happy voting!

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Round of 16 

Junto March Madness 2017 is Here!

Welcome one and all to the 5th annual Junto March Madness (#JMM17). This year’s tournament will cover books in early American history (broadly defined) published since 2014. There are, however, a few key differences from past years. First, this year’s tournament will feature 32 books rather than 64. Moreover, we have decided to forego the open nomination process. The 32 works in the bracket below were selected by the 25 members of the blog. Before voting begins, let me also offer our usual disclaimer: JMM is meant to be fun and to expose more people to excellent recent scholarship on early America. It is not meant to determine the “best” book on early American history since 2014 but to show the favorites of our readers. As always, we encourage participants to use both the comments here on the blog and our hashtag (#JMM17) to discuss these works. With that out of the way, here is this year’s bracket (click for full-size): Continue reading

Q&A: Patrick Spero and Michael Zuckerman

15598Following on from yesterday’s review of The American Revolution RebornThe Junto was fortunate enough to get to ask a few questions of the volume’s editors. Both Patrick Spero, Librarian of the American Philosophical Society, and Michael Zuckerman, Professor of History Emeritus at the University of Pennsylvania, were instrumental in organizing the highly successful conference that led to the volume. In the Q&A below, the organizers/editors reflect back on both the conference and the volume, their effect on their own views of the Revolution, and their hopes for the legacy of both the conference and the volume. The Q&A is published here in its entirety. Continue reading

In Memoriam: Joyce Appleby (1929-2016)

Joyce ApplebyJoyce Oldham Appleby was born in Nebraska on April 9, 1929. After a rootless childhood that involved a number of moves from Illinois to California (and a number of places in between), Appleby attended Stanford University, where she received her BA in History in 1950. After spending a few years working as a writer for Mademoiselle in New York City, she returned to California and subsequently decided to pursue graduate study in history. Following an MA at UC-Santa Barbara, Appleby went on to complete her PhD at Claremont Graduate University in 1966 with a dissertation entitled, “An American in Paris: The Career of an American Pamphlet in French Revolutionary Politics, 1787-89.” In 1968, after a year abroad in Paris with her family, which, by now, included three children, Appleby published her first article in the American Historical Review, “The Jefferson-Adams Rupture and the First French Translation of John Adams’ Defence,” and accepted a job at San Diego State University. Continue reading