Junto March Madness Round 1 Results

JMM16It was an interesting first round, everybody. 168 of you voted, which, as you’ll see, was a real problem in one of our brackets. Upsets occurred in every category, and we had our first ever March Madness tie. Read on for your results!In the Atlantic World, Warsh surged at the end to defeat Gould. Things got complicated, as they tend to, in the Gender bracket, where Camp and Hughes Dayton tied (more on how we’re dealing with this, below). In Economic and Social History Rao smoked Hartog, and in the American Revolution Brown beat out Jasanoff. The History of Ideas had two upsets; Junto supporter Fea lost to Butler, despite a strong Twitter game, and Kloppenberg lost to Grasso. In Native American history Barr upset Greer, and in Slavery and Race Formation Waldstreicher just beat out Johnson. Our Historiography and Theory bracket was the only bracket in which the seeds performed as anticipated. It’s shaping up to be an exciting tournament!

Atlantic World

(1) Morgan, Jennifer. “‘Some Could Suckle over their Shoulder’: Male Travelers, Female Bodies, and the Gendering of Racial Ideology, 1500–1700.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 54, no. 1 (January 1997), 167–192. 73% beat
(8) Vidal, Cécile. “For a Comprehensive History of the Atlantic World or Histories Connected In and Beyond the Atlantic World?” Annales. Histoire, Sciences Sociales (English Edition) 67, no. 2 (April-June 2012): 279–300. 27%

(2) Games, Alison. “Atlantic History: Definitions, Challenges, and Opportunities.” American Historical Review 111, no. 3 (June 2006): 741–57. 59% beat
(7) Fitz, Caitlin. “The Hemispheric Dimensions of Early US Nationalism: The War of 1812, its Aftermath, and Spanish American Independence.” Journal of American History 102, no. 2 (Sep. 2015): 356–379. 41%

(3) Ferrer, Ada. “Haiti, Free Soil, and Antislavery in the Revolutionary Atlantic.” American Historical Review 117 (2012): 40–66. 57% beat
(6) Parsons, Chris, and Murphy, Kathleen S. “Ecosystems under Sail: Specimen Transport in the Eighteenth-Century French and British Atlantics.” Early American Studies 10, no. 3 (Fall 2012): 503-29. 43%

(4) Gould, Eliga. “Zones of Law, Zones of Violence: The Legal Geography of the British Atlantic, circa 1772.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 60, no. 3 (July 2003): 471–510. 46% lost to
(5) Warsh, Molly. “Political Ecology in the Spanish Caribbean.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 71, no. 4 (Oct. 2014), 517–50. 54%

Gender

(1) Zagarri, Rosemarie. “The Rights of Man and Woman in Post-Revolutionary America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 55, no. 2 (April 1998): 203–230. 60% beat
(8) Ditz, Toby. “Shipwrecked; or, Masculinity Imperiled: Mercantile Representations of Failure and the Gendered Self in Eighteenth-Century Philadelphia.” Journal of American History 81, no. 1 (June 1994): 51-80. 40%

(2) Kerber, Linda. “Separate Spheres, Female Worlds, Woman’s Place: The Rhetoric of Women’s History.” Journal of American History 75 (1988): 9–39. 53% beat
(7) McCurry, Stephanie. “The Two Faces of Republicanism: Gender and Proslavery Politics in Antebellum South Carolina.” Journal of American History 78, no. 4 (1992): 1245–64. 47%

(3) Dayton, Cornelia. “Taking the Trade: Abortion and Gender Relations in an Eighteenth-Century New England Village.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 48, no. 1 (Jan. 1991): 19–49. 50% tied
(6) Camp, Stephanie M. H. “The Pleasures of Resistance: Enslaved Women and Body Politics in the Plantation South, 1830–1861.” Journal of Southern History 68, no. 3 (August 2002): 533-72. 50%

(4) Brown, Kathleen. “‘Changed… into the Fashion of Man’: The Politics of Sexual Difference in a Seventeenth-Century Anglo-American Settlement.” Journal of the History of Sexuality 6, no. 2 (Oct. 1995): 171–193. 63% beat
(5) Smith Rosenberg, Carroll. “The Female World of Love and Ritual: Relations Between Women in Nineteenth Century America.” Signs 1, no. 1 (Autumn 1975): 1–29. 37%

Economic and Social History

(1) Breen, T. H.  “Baubles of Britain: The American and Consumer Revolutions of the Eighteenth Century.” Past & Present 119 (1988): 73–104. 73% beat
(8) Bushman, Richard. “Markets and Composite Farms in Early America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 55, no. 3 (July 1998): 351–374. 27%

(2) Maier, Pauline. “Popular Uprisings and Civil Authority in Eighteenth-Century America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, 27, No. 1 (Jan., 1970): 3–35. 52% beat
(7) Rothman, Joshua. “The Hazards of the Flush Times: Gambling, Mob Violence, and the Anxieties of America’s Market Revolution.” Journal of American History, 95, no. 3 (December 2008): 651–77. 48%

(3) Nash, Gary, “Transformation of Urban Politics, 1700-1765.” Journal of American History 60 (Dec. 1973): 605–632. 67% beat
(6) Smith, Billy. “Inequality in Late Colonial Philadelphia: A Note on its Nature and Growth.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 41, no. 4 (Oct. 1984): 629–645. 33%

(4) Hartog, Hendrik. “Pigs and Positivism.” Wisconsin Law Review 899 (1985). 44% lost to
(5) Rao, Gautham. “The Federal Posse Comitatus Doctrine: Slavery, Compulsion, and Statecraft in Mid-Nineteenth-Century America.” Law and History Review 26 (Spring 2008): 1–56. 56%

American Revolution

(1) Young, Alfred. “George Robert Twelves Hewes (1742–1840): A Boston Shoemaker and the Memory of the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 38, no. 4 (Oct. 1981): 561–623. 77% beat
(8) Kim, Sun Bok. “Limits of Politicization: The Experience of Westchester County, New York.” Journal of American History 80, no. 3 (1993): 868–89. 23%

(2) Freeman, Joanne. “Dueling as Politics: Reinterpreting the Burr-Hamilton Duel.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 53 (1995): 289-318. 61% beat
(7) Holton, Woody. “Did Democracy Cause the Recession…?”Journal of American History 92, no. 2 (Sept. 2005): 442–469. 39%

(3) Lemisch, Jesse. “Jack Tarr in the Streets: Merchant Seamen in the Politics of Revolutionary America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 25, no. 3 (July 1968): 371–407. 56% beat
(6) McDonnell, Michael. “Class War? Class Struggles during the American Revolution in Virginia.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 63, no. 2 (April 2006): 305–44. 44%

(4) Jasanoff, Maya. “The Other Side of the Revolution: Loyalists in the British Empire.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 65, no. 2 (April 2008): 205–32. 47% lost to
(5) Brown, Christopher. “Empire without Slaves: British Concepts of Emancipation in the Age of the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 56, no. 2 (1999): 273–306. 53%

History of Ideas

(1) Fea, John. “The Way of Improvement Leads Home: Philip Vickers Fithian’s Rural Enlightenment.” Journal of American History 90, no. 2 (September 2003). 42% lost to
(8) Butler, Jon. “Enthusiasm Described and Decried: The Great Awakening as Interpretative Fiction.” Journal of American History 69, no. 2 (Sept. 1982): 305–325. 58%

(2) Wood, Gordon. “Rhetoric and Reality in the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 23, no. 1 (1966): 4–32. 50.3% beat
(7) Howe, Daniel Walker. “The Evangelical Movement and Political Culture in the Northeast During the Second Party System.” Journal of American History 77, no. 4 (March 1991). 49.7%

(3) Kloppenberg, James. “The Virtues of Liberalism: Christianity, Republicanism, and Ethics in Early American Political Discourse.” Journal of American History, 74 (June 1987): 9–33. 43% lost to
(6) Grasso, Christopher. “Deist Monster: On Religious Common Sense in the Wake of the American Revolution.” Journal of American History 95, no. 2 (June 1995): 43–68. 57%

(4) Loughran, Trish. “Disseminating Common Sense: Thomas Paine and the Problem of the Early National Bestseller.” American Literature, 78, no. 1 (2006): 1–28. 51% beat
(5) Caron, Nathalie and Naomi Wulf. “American Enlightenments: Continuity and Renewal.” Journal of American History 99, no. 4 (2013): 1072–1091. 49%

Historiography/Theory

(1) Rodgers, Daniel T. “Republicanism: The Career of a Concept.” Journal of American History 79, no. 1 (1992): 11–38. 55% beat
(8) Stoler, Laura. “Tense and Tender Ties: The Politics of Comparison in North American History and Post-Colonial Studies.” Journal of American History 88, no. 3 (December 2001): 829–865. 45%

(2) Lepore, Jill. “Historians Who Love Too Much: Reflections on Microhistory and Biography.” Journal of American History 88, no.1 (June 2001): 129–144. 72% beat
(7) Bodle, Wayne. “The ‘Myth of the Middle Colonies’ Reconsidered: The Process of Regionalization in Early America.” Pennsylvania Magazine of History and Biography 113 (1989): 527–548. 28%

(3) Furstenberg, Francois. “Beyond Slavery and Freedom: Autonomy, Agency, and Resistance in Early American Political Discourse.” Journal of American History 89, no. 4 (March, 2003), 1295–1330. 70% beat
(6) Meranze, Michael. “Culture and Governance: Reflections on the Cultural History of Eighteenth-Century British America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 65, no. 4 (October 2008): 713–44. 30%

(4) Saunt, Claudio. “Go West: Mapping Early American Historiography.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 65, no. 4 (October 2008): 745–78. 56% beat
(5) Wilson, Kathleen. “Rethinking the Colonial State: Family, Gender, and Governmentality in Eighteenth-Century British Frontiers.” American Historical Review 116, no. 5 (2011): 1294–1322. 44%

Native American History

(1) Hämäläinen, Pekka. “The Politics of Grass: European Expansion, Ecological Change, and Indigenous Power in the Southwest Borderlands.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 67, no. 2 (April 2010): 173–208. 51% beat
(8) Fenn, Elizabeth. “Biological Warfare in Eighteenth-Century North America: Beyond Jeffery Amherst.” Journal of American History 86, no. 4 (March 2000): 1552–1580. 49%

(2) Merrell, James. “The Indians New World.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 41, no. 4 (October, 1984), pp. 538–565. 77% beat
(7) Dubcovsky, Alejandra. “One Hundred Sixty-One Knots, Two Plates, and One Emperor: Creek Information Networks in the Era of the Yamasee War.” Ethnohistory 59, no. 3 (Summer 2012), 489–513. 23%

(3) Richter, Daniel. “War and Culture: The Iroquois Experience.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 40, no. 4 (October 1983): 528–59. 72% beat
(6) Fisher, Linford. “Indian Baptism and Conversion in the Rogers Williams Code.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 71, no. 2 (April 2014): 175–202. 28%

(4) Greer, Allan. “Commons and Enclosure in the Colonization of North America.” American Historical Review 117, no. 2 (April 2012): 365–86. 28% lost to
(5) Barr, Juliana. “From Captives to Slaves: Commodifying Indian Women in the Borderlands.” Journal of American History 92, no. 1 (June 2005) 72%

Slavery and Race Formation

(1) Morgan, Edmund. “Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox.” Journal of American History 59, no. 1 (June 1972): 5–29. 85% beat
(8) Huggins, Nathaniel. “Deforming Mirror of Truth: Slavery and the Master Narrative of American History.” Radical History Review 49 (1991): 25–48. 15%

(2) Brown, Vincent. “Social Death and Political Life in the Study of Slavery.” American Historical Review 114, no. 5, (December 2009): 1231–1249. 56% beat
(7) Fields, Barbara J. “Slavery, Race, and Ideology in the USA.” New Left Review 181 (May/June 1990): 95–118. 44%

(3) Baptist, Edward. “‘Cuffy,’ ‘Fancy Maids,’ and ‘One-Eyed Men’: Rape, Commodification, and the Domestic Slave Trade in the United States.” American Historical Review 106, No. 5 (December, 2001). 40% lost to
(6) O’Malley, Gregory E. “Beyond the Middle Passage: Slave Migration from the Caribbean to North America, 1619-1807.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 66, no. 1 (January 2009): 125–72. 60%

(4) Johnson, Walter. “On Agency.” Journal of Social History 27 (2003): 113–24. 49% lost to
(5) Waldstreicher, David. “Reading the Runaways: Self-Fashioning, Print Culture, and Confidence in Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century Mid-Atlantic.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 56, no. 2 (April 1999): 243–272. 51%

To address the tie, we’re going to run this match-up again to simulate the overtime situation that happens in March Madness basketball games. This poll will be open until 5 p.m. today.

Round 2 voting begins tomorrow. Here are the matchups.

Atlantic World

(1) Morgan, Jennifer. “‘Some Could Suckle over their Shoulder’: Male Travelers, Female Bodies, and the Gendering of Racial Ideology, 1500–1700.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 54, no. 1 (January 1997), 167–192. vs. (5) Warsh, Molly. “Political Ecology in the Spanish Caribbean.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 71, no. 4 (Oct. 2014), 517–50.

(2) Games, Alison. “Atlantic History: Definitions, Challenges, and Opportunities.” American Historical Review 111, no. 3 (June 2006): 741–57. vs. (3) Ferrer, Ada. “Haiti, Free Soil, and Antislavery in the Revolutionary Atlantic.” American Historical Review 117 (2012): 40–66.

Gender

(1) Zagarri, Rosemarie. “The Rights of Man and Woman in Post-Revolutionary America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 55, no. 2 (April 1998): 203–230.vs. (4) Brown, Kathleen. “‘Changed… into the Fashion of Man’: The Politics of Sexual Difference in a Seventeenth-Century Anglo-American Settlement.” Journal of the History of Sexuality 6, no. 2 (Oct. 1995): 171–193.

(2) Kerber, Linda. “Separate Spheres, Female Worlds, Woman’s Place: The Rhetoric of Women’s History.” Journal of American History 75 (1988): 9–39. vs. (3) Dayton OR (6) Camp

Economic and Social History

(1) Breen, T. H.  “Baubles of Britain: The American and Consumer Revolutions of the Eighteenth Century.” Past & Present 119 (1988): 73–104. vs. (5) Rao, Gautham. “The Federal Posse Comitatus Doctrine: Slavery, Compulsion, and Statecraft in Mid-Nineteenth-Century America.” Law and History Review 26 (Spring 2008): 1–56.

(2) Maier, Pauline. “Popular Uprisings and Civil Authority in Eighteenth-Century America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series, 27, No. 1 (Jan., 1970): 3–35. vs. (3) Nash, Gary, “Transformation of Urban Politics, 1700-1765.” Journal of American History 60 (Dec. 1973): 605–632.

American Revolution

(1) Young, Alfred. “George Robert Twelves Hewes (1742–1840): A Boston Shoemaker and the Memory of the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 38, no. 4 (Oct. 1981): 561–623. vs. (5) Brown, Christopher. “Empire without Slaves: British Concepts of Emancipation in the Age of the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 56, no. 2 (1999): 273–306.

(2) Freeman, Joanne. “Dueling as Politics: Reinterpreting the Burr-Hamilton Duel.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 53 (1995): 289-318. vs. (3) Lemisch, Jesse. “Jack Tarr in the Streets: Merchant Seamen in the Politics of Revolutionary America.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 25, no. 3 (July 1968): 371–407.

History of Ideas

(8) Butler, Jon. “Enthusiasm Described and Decried: The Great Awakening as Interpretative Fiction.” Journal of American History 69, no. 2 (Sept. 1982): 305–325. vs. (4) Loughran, Trish. “Disseminating Common Sense: Thomas Paine and the Problem of the Early National Bestseller.” American Literature, 78, no. 1 (2006): 1–28.

(2) Wood, Gordon. “Rhetoric and Reality in the American Revolution.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 23, no. 1 (1966): 4–32. vs. (6) Grasso, Christopher. “Deist Monster: On Religious Common Sense in the Wake of the American Revolution.” Journal of American History 95, no. 2 (June 1995): 43–68.

Historiography/Theory

(1) Rodgers, Daniel T. “Republicanism: The Career of a Concept.” Journal of American History 79, no. 1 (1992): 11–38. vs. (4) Saunt, Claudio. “Go West: Mapping Early American Historiography.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 65, no. 4 (October 2008): 745–78.

(2) Lepore, Jill. “Historians Who Love Too Much: Reflections on Microhistory and Biography.” Journal of American History 88, no.1 (June 2001): 129–144. vs. (3) Furstenberg, Francois. “Beyond Slavery and Freedom: Autonomy, Agency, and Resistance in Early American Political Discourse.” Journal of American History 89, no. 4 (March, 2003), 1295–1330.

Native American History

(1) Hämäläinen, Pekka. “The Politics of Grass: European Expansion, Ecological Change, and Indigenous Power in the Southwest Borderlands.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 67, no. 2 (April 2010): 173–208. vs. (5) Barr, Juliana. “From Captives to Slaves: Commodifying Indian Women in the Borderlands.” Journal of American History 92, no. 1 (June 2005)

(2) Merrell, James. “The Indians New World.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 41, no. 4 (October, 1984), pp. 538–565. vs. (3) Richter, Daniel. “War and Culture: The Iroquois Experience.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 40, no. 4 (October 1983): 528–59. 

Slavery and Race Formation

(1) Morgan, Edmund. “Slavery and Freedom: The American Paradox.” Journal of American History 59, no. 1 (June 1972): 5–29. vs. (5) Waldstreicher, David. “Reading the Runaways: Self-Fashioning, Print Culture, and Confidence in Slavery in the Eighteenth-Century Mid-Atlantic.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 56, no. 2 (April 1999): 243–272.

(2) Brown, Vincent. “Social Death and Political Life in the Study of Slavery.” American Historical Review 114, no. 5, (December 2009): 1231–1249. vs. (6) O’Malley, Gregory E. “Beyond the Middle Passage: Slave Migration from the Caribbean to North America, 1619-1807.” The William and Mary Quarterly, Third Series 66, no. 1 (January 2009): 125–72.

4 comments on “Junto March Madness Round 1 Results

  1. Jay E. says:

    Fea lost? I am saddened.

  2. We are happy to see that “Disseminating Common Sense: Thomas Paine and the Problem of the Early National Bestseller” is still in the running for this year’s Junto March Madness! We’ve made the article freely available for the next three months here: http://americanliterature.dukejournals.org/content/78/1/1.full.pdf+html. Please feel free to share this dedicated link. Enjoy, and best of luck to the contenders!
    Katie Smart,
    Duke University Press

Engage

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s